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Environment

Translational Ecololgy
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Wed Jul 3rd, 2019

So few of us have spent much time beneath the sea that it is not widely appreciated that the ocean is a noisy place. Sound carries longer distances at faster...

Translational Ecololgy
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Tue Jun 25th, 2019

Among the 80,000 compounds that help promise “better living through chemistry,” are 3,000 or so perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFAS) that repel grease and water. These have widespread use in non-stick...

Translational Ecololgy
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Mon Jun 17th, 2019

Deduced from a variety of methods, the average rise in sea level has been about 1 to 2 mm/yr for the last 100 years, but recent rates are now ≥...

Translational Ecololgy
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Tue May 28th, 2019

Nearly everyone likes trees—for various reasons, not the least of which is that trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, potentially mitigating global warming. A campaign by the Nature Conservancy...

Translational Ecololgy
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Mon May 20th, 2019

If you are like most people, you have probably never heard of carbonyl sulfide, even though it is the most abundant sulfur gas in Earth’s atmosphere. Carbonyl sulfide is a...

Music Review
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Thu May 9th, 2019

By many accounts, humans have dramatically reduced the number of fish in the sea. About 15 years ago, Myers and Worm estimated that global fish stocks of the most desirable...

Translational Ecololgy
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Mon Apr 22nd, 2019

Forty-nine years ago today, we celebrated the first Earth Day. Environmental degradation had grown too obvious to ignore, and scientists demanded action. President Nixon moved to create the Environmental Protection...

Translational Ecology
by Bill Schlesinger in Environment
Thu Apr 11th, 2019

The latest issue of Science contains an article describing the worldwide decline of amphibian populations due to the international spread of chytridiomycosis, a lethal fungal disease, largely as a result...

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