Food & Drink

by Rona Boyer
For years I made this soup incorrectly. Most people liked it, but Gerard did not. Loulou, my 90-year-old mother-in-law made it for us on our recent trip to France, and a light bulb went on over my head. I finally learned that "pistou"—despite the fact that it is a cold sauce made with basil, garlic and olive oil—is not simply a French translation of "pesto" but a different version of the same sauce. The Italian version (equally delicious) has pine nuts and no tomato paste, which gives it a very different texture and flavor. It is better suited to pasta. According to the French,” pistou” is better for this soup.   Six Servings
by Rona Boyer
In last week's article about the Hudson Valley Harvard Club dinner, we omitted the fact that Chef Haviland chose to feature the natural beef from Millbrook's Walbridge Farms in one of the most appreciated dishes of the evening, his fabulous Black Angus creation. Also, the delicious kale and bacon was served on a bed of locally produced polenta from Wild Hive Farm. In our article about Millbrook's...
by Rona Boyer
The original Wiener Schnitzel was always made from veal cutlets and no other meat, and for me they are still the best. But schnitzels are also good when made of pork, chicken or turkey breast. The important thing is to ensure that the boneless meat has been thinned and tenderized with a mallet before coating and cooking. Serve with Spaetzle, boiled potatoes or—best—parslied potatoes (see below). If making the parslied potatoes, you will want to begin making them before frying the tenderized cutlets.  
by Rona Boyer
I have always known that Marona's Market (which started as a butcher shop) sells very good beef. I often purchase their rib-eye steaks, which Gerard and I enjoy with a salad. But I had never dared to try their filet mignon. These filets, or tournedos, are almost always tender but can be fairly dry and tasteless, so I stay away from them. Last week we had dinner with friends at their house in Millbrook, and...
by Rona Boyer
Chef Francis Mallman's famous cook book ("Seven Fires")  about grilling the Argentine way was demonstrated this week at a spectacular "Night of Fire and Desire" at a private party in a long field in the Millbrook area.  Some of the 250 or so guests live locally but at least half came to Millbrook for the occasion.  The chef was flown up with a few of his sous chefs, barbecue pits were dug up...
by Rona Boyer
     I actually did go to Harvard—Harvard Business School, that is. Well, actually it was a summer program run by the marketing department on the campus. But for six weeks I lived in Harvard’s dorms, went to Harvard’s classrooms and studied 100 of the famous marketing case histories taught by the Harvard Business School marketing professors. So I feel a certain affinity for the famous...
by Rona Boyer
Most of my friends and readers know I lived in France for many years, but few know that I also spent a few years in Italy, where I learned to love pasta—when it is freshly made, cooked "al dente" and paired with the right sauce. Few Italian restaurants in the United States ever equal those standards. Once I had pasta cooked for me by Mario Batali (I was in the audience of the ABC television show "The...