Food & Drink

by Rona Boyer
In his book Braise, A Journey Through International Cuisine, Daniel Boulud explains that every new cook who comes to work in his kitchen is asked to prepare for the staff a dish from his or her home country. While the chefs come from the four corners of the earth and the taste and ingredients differ, the dish is almost invariably braised. This ancient technique is popular everywhere because...
by Rona Boyer
If you like homemade pasta but have neither the time nor inclination to make it the way Italian grandmothers did, try my recent discovery. These small pieces of chicken breast and rosemary wrapped in thin pasta are delicious. The package directions suggest three minutes in boiling water—do not overcook them, or you will be disappointed. I prepare the chicken ravioli with Doppio Burro sauce—which is...
by Rona Boyer
Candy bars, potato chips and doughnuts in school vending machines will be replaced by granola bars, fruit cups, trail mixes, pretzels and baked chips. The ruling of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (inspired by the leadership of first lady Michelle Obama) is scheduled to go into effect by July 1, 2014. The new regulations set limits for fat, salt and sugar on items sold in places such as vending machines...
by Rona Boyer
One of our favorite braised dishes is, of course, braised lamb shaanks. 
by Rona Boyer
Chef Waldy Malouf—author of both The Hudson River Valley Cookbook and High Heat: Grilling and Roasting Year-Round, chef-owner of the Midtown eatery Beacon, executive chef of Rainbow Room, Hudson River Club and Le Crémaillère—recently moved to Clinton Corners to take on his latest challenge, at the Culinary Institute in Hyde Park. A 1975 CIA graduate, he returns to his alma mater as Senior Director...
by Rona Boyer
When the Culinary Institute in Hyde Park first opened The Bocuse Restaurant one year ago, the school prepared a special dinner for Chef Paul Bocuse and other world-renowned chefs, including Thomas Keller, Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Daniel Boulud, and Michel Richard. Last week, to celebrate the one-year anniversary, The Bocuse repeated the menu, and this time, Gerard and I were in attendance. The menu was...
by Rona Boyer
When our children were small, Gerard went hunting almost every Saturday and I took the girls to lunch. We alternated between our favorite Chinese restaurant and a Moroccan one for a Couscous Royal. When we moved back to the States, it was easy to find good Chinese food, but the couscous was nearly impossible—so I learned to make it myself. I did not have a "couscousier" or the super-fine grains to steam, so I improvised. To this day, my daughter, Jennifer, asks for it on her birthday. We had it Sunday, so I took the opportunity to ask Gerard to take a photo and I wrote down my recipe. Here they are. You can just make the Lamb Couscous or add any or all of the other meats, which make it a "Royal."     Couscous is actually the name of the granules of durum wheat (semolina) served in North Africa instead of pasta or rice. It has also become the name of dish of stew served with it.