Food & Drink

by Rona Boyer
I have been a fan of Kate Weiner's puff pastry since I moved to Millbrook. She makes it perfectly. And having hand-made puff pastry tarts to enjoy within a few short days or even hours of their baking is a luxury offered to few outside of France.  Kate makes both sweet and salty versions (none combined -that I know of), but her newest creation is my favorite: Caramel Pear Tarts.  Serve for...
by Rona Boyer
Asado is the national dish of Argentina as well as the Spanish and Portuguese names for "barbecue". Millbrook culinary cullture has been deeply affected by the many Argentine polo players and their families who spend their winters (our summers) here playing at Mashomack and dining al freesco at their Asados. Sunday we attended one of these excellent feasts of beef, pork, sausages and veggies that were...
by Rona Boyer
As soup season is fast approaching and the culinary media will be inundated with recipes, I thought that with the help of a little research, I would clarify some of the confusion about what to call a soup. Is it a "potage," a "bisque" or a "veloute"? A "broth,” a “stock" or a "bouillon"? While some people use many of these terms interchangeably, most of them are extremely precise and should be reserved for...
by Rona Boyer
For years I made this soup incorrectly. Most people liked it, but Gerard did not. Loulou, my 90-year-old mother-in-law made it for us on our recent trip to France, and a light bulb went on over my head. I finally learned that "pistou"—despite the fact that it is a cold sauce made with basil, garlic and olive oil—is not simply a French translation of "pesto" but a different version of the same sauce. The Italian version (equally delicious) has pine nuts and no tomato paste, which gives it a very different texture and flavor. It is better suited to pasta. According to the French,” pistou” is better for this soup.   Six Servings
by Rona Boyer
In last week's article about the Hudson Valley Harvard Club dinner, we omitted the fact that Chef Haviland chose to feature the natural beef from Millbrook's Walbridge Farms in one of the most appreciated dishes of the evening, his fabulous Black Angus creation. Also, the delicious kale and bacon was served on a bed of locally produced polenta from Wild Hive Farm. In our article about Millbrook's...
by Rona Boyer
The original Wiener Schnitzel was always made from veal cutlets and no other meat, and for me they are still the best. But schnitzels are also good when made of pork, chicken or turkey breast. The important thing is to ensure that the boneless meat has been thinned and tenderized with a mallet before coating and cooking. Serve with Spaetzle, boiled potatoes or—best—parslied potatoes (see below). If making the parslied potatoes, you will want to begin making them before frying the tenderized cutlets.  
by Rona Boyer
I have always known that Marona's Market (which started as a butcher shop) sells very good beef. I often purchase their rib-eye steaks, which Gerard and I enjoy with a salad. But I had never dared to try their filet mignon. These filets, or tournedos, are almost always tender but can be fairly dry and tasteless, so I stay away from them. Last week we had dinner with friends at their house in Millbrook, and...