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Gipson on the attack

by Stephen Kaye
Wed Jul 27th, 2016

Terry Gipson ans Sue Sorino

Terry Gipson hits out at incumbent Sue Serino in his latest barrage of campaign positions posted on his website.  He takes Serino to task for accepting campaign contributions from the NYC real estate lobby and from the Republican Party, who together make up for most of her campaign funds. 

One significant player in the NYC real estate lobby, Leonard Litwin,  gave Serino $41,000 in her last election.  Litwin’s campaign money turned up in both the Dean Skelos and Silver trials.  In her last campaign she received $591,000 from the Republican Party.  The party also reported spending $417,614 on her behalf, mostly for mailings and TV time.  Gipson concludes that in exchange for over $1 million of campaign financing, Serino is little more than an agent of the NYC realtor lobby. 

Serino has attacked Gipson who, as a Democrat, sided with the then majority Senate Democrats in his votes.  

Gipson, who favors limits on campaign spending from corporations, charges that Serino has blocked reforms on campaign spending.  He charges that Serino did nothing to restore the expanded Star exemption for seniors.  Gipson champions revising how education dollars are raised, a subject Serino avoids.

Gipson says Serino has also avoided doing anything on extending health insurance to cover Lyme disease.  Serino’s solution was to launch another study, a delaying action taken to appease the insurance industry.  She also sponsored in the senate legislation that authorizes the Department of Health to make the public more aware of the dangers of Lyme and tick-bone infections.  Her bill, sponsored in the Assembly by Didi Barrett, was passed in 2015 and signed into law by Gov. Cuomo on July 21, 2016.  The text of the bill follows. 

A LYME DISEASE AND TICK-BORNE INFECTION AWARENESS AND PREVENTION PROGRAM DESIGNED TO PROMOTE THE AWARENESS AND PREVENTION METHODS AGAINST  LYME DISEASE AND TICK-BORNE INFECTIONS. SUCH INFORMATION SHALL INCLUDE BUT NOT BE LIMITED TO GUIDELINES AND METHODS OF PREVENTION, INCLUDING THE SAFE USE OF RECOMMENDED INSECT REPELLENTS, THE BEST PRACTICES FOR TICK REMOVAL, RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE REDUCTION OF EXPOSURE TO TICKS AND APPROPRIATE COURSE OF ACTION ONCE A TICK IS REMOVED FROM THE BODY.