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Sheriff’s Office investigates one-car fatal crash                                      

The second public hearing on the 263-unit Silo Ridge Resort Community drew 70 comments from both critics and supporters at the Amenia Town Hall on September 18.  

The Amenia Planning Board heard from Silo Ridge employees, its contractors and their families, many of whom had been solicited by publicist Jeanne Rebillard.  They spoke “in favor” of the project without mentioning the issues related to the SEQR review which was the purpose of the hearing.   A yellow flyer went out to business owners in the area urging them to support Silo Ridge. One such flyer was prominently displayed last week at the Cascade Spirit Shoppe in Amenia. 

The story on the Cozy Corner appearing in this week's issue (September 24, 2014) was in error.  Robert Trump has no ownership interest in the restaurant.  The partners in the restaurant, that will be named Monte's Local Kitchen and Tap Room, are Ann Marie Pallan, Paul Monte, Angelo Monte, Jr., Teresa Biscardi, Phyllis Lomitila and Dafner Mizrahi.  Dafna is a graduate of the Culinary Institute and will be the operations manager.  P.J. Clarke's has no direct connection with the restaurant.

Ms. Miszrahi explained in a telephone call Thursday that Mr. Trump is a friend and P.J. Clarke's is owned by a distant relative.  She said the emphasis will be on local sourcing.  She is looking for an October opening.

“What kind of artist do you want to be?” was the first question that Millbrook High School art teacher Michael Spross asked his students on the first day of school. Spross has been teaching art at Millbrook for 30 years. He began his class with a probing question.   

“I want to let that guide them into their first project. What kind of artistic statement do they want to make? What message do they want to leave people with?” 

Spross has a long white beard and eyes that seem to twinkle. He is an alumnus of the Millbrook Central School District.  His predecessor, Constance Horton, was his teacher when he was a student at Millbrook. Now Spross finds himself teaching his former students’ grandchildren. Longevity seems to be consistent for the high schools art program.  

Spross said that students responded to his opening question by expressing interest in everything from fashion design to country living.  Their first project is a reflective drawing. 

While stories of young people breaking into the empty Bennett College buildings are legion on the Internet, the new owners are taking the issue of safety seriously.  The New York State Police made five arrests of Bennett trespassers in August and September. 

Oakleigh Thorne has given the state police permission to arrest anyone who trespasses on the property.  Clearly visible signs warn trespassers of the consequences.  The state police are called by residents of the Bennett condos when  they see trespassers. Because there is a fence and the buildings are sealed, trespassing is a criminal offense punishable by fines and jail time.   

A public hearing on the application of the Cary Institute to designate Canoe Hill Road, Fowler Road and Nardone Road as scenic roads was opened by the Town of Washington Town Board on Thursday, September 18.  There was little comment from the public.  The public hearing remained open until the close of the meeting, when the town board approved the designation.     

Recreation Director Warren McMillan reviewed activities at the town park and pool. He noted that the activity and income from user fees were consistent with prior years. McMillan mentioned that the handicapped parking was used by the unhandicapped because those spots are the best place from which parents can watch their kids play soccer.  McMillan said he had had arguments and might need police reinforcements. 

The second public hearing on the 263-unit Silo Ridge Resort Community drew 70 comments, from both critics and supporters, at the Amenia Town Hall on September 18.  

The Amenia Planning Board heard from Silo Ridge employees, its contractors and their families, many of whom had been solicited by publicist Jeanne Rebillard.  They spoke “in favor” of the project without mentioning the issues related to the SEQR review, which was the purpose of the hearing. A yellow flyer went out to business owners in the area, urging them to support Silo Ridge. One such flyer was prominently displayed last week at the Cascade Spirit Shoppe in Amenia. 

The people speaking in favor of the project included six members of the publicist’s family, including herself.  From their comments it seemed that there was a widespread belief that the project’s approval depended on a popularity contest.  

Kent Tritle, organist for the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, where he is also Director of Cathedral Music, will play a benefit concert for the New York Oratorio Society at Smithfield Church in Amenia on Sunday, September 27, at 3 p.m. Tritle is in his tenth season as music director of the New York Oratorio Society and his eighth season as music director of Musica Sacra in New York City. His program at Smithfield will consist of one work by Pachelbel, six by Bach, three by Brahms, and one by Rheinberger, a prolific nineteenth-century composer remembered today principally for his elaborate and challenging organ compositions. Suggested admission is $20. A reception will follow in the church basement. This is Kent Tritle’s fifth appearance playing the historic Johnson tracker organ at Smithfield Church. For more information call (347) 330-0973.

The first thing you notice when you enter the front door of the White Hart Inn is the art. Over the desk in the lobby hangs a magnificent Frank Stella. There are two Jasper Johns works, a silkscreen by Julian Lethbridge, and other works on paper by artists from this part of Connecticut and New York.

 

The White Hart (a hart is a stag) reopened on August 27 after a long period of being shuttered. It was purchased last May by a group of 11 owners, all of whom have ties to northwestern Connecticut. The building, which dates to the mid–nineteenth century, has had a number of owners, including Edsel Ford, the late John Harney, and Reese Harris of Salisbury.

 

Millbrook Central School District welcomes four new staff to the district this fall. The Millbrook Independent was able to catch up with them to find out where they are coming from, what position they will hold and what they hope to bring to the district this school year.  

Christopher DelVentura is the assistant principal for the Middle school and the High school. DelVentura holds a bachelors in history and a minor in Political Science.  He has a masters in Social Studies, a certificate of Advance Studies in School building leadership and district leadership from CUNY New Paltz. Before coming to Millbrook DelVentura worked for 12 years as a Social Studies teacher in Connecticut’s Washingtonville school district. DelVentura learned about Millbrook from his niece who graduated from the high school last year. 

DelVentura said the most important part of his job is “the safety and well being of the kids.” Although physical safety is important, emotional safety is equally so. “My number one goal is to make school a positive experience for the kids.” New challenges include social media. 

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